‘Stage Door’ reveals roles

 

David Kingsley, played by Michael Ryan Correa, left, sees in a playful manner if Terry Randall, played by Blanca Espinoza, is ready for the show biz. PHOTO COURTESY OF DAVID LAIRD SCOTT

 

By Sonia Saavedra

Rejection, frustration and betrayal play a big role in the lives of aspiring actresses in the play, “Stage Door,” set in the 1950s.

“Stage Door” takes place in New York in a rooming house called the Footlights Club.

The Footlights Club houses many aspiring actresses all wanting the same thing, their big break.

Along the road to stardom, they experience various obstacles.

They are just trying to survive the crazy world they call “show biz.”

“Stage Door” is a witty play filled with many different characters, each with a story to tell.

The play mostly revolves around Terry Randall, played by the talented Blanca Espinoza, an aspiring actress with a promising future who has her heart set on theater.

Randall has a hard time finding roles that she wants and tries not to sell out like her roommate Jean Maitland, played by Cynthia Villar.

To add to her list of problems, Terry also deals with relationship troubles and having to support her father.

“Stage Door” is filled with many talented actors and actresses.

Leading lady Espinoza does a remarkable job as Randall.

Espinoza makes her character stand out by getting it right in every way.

Espinoza is full of energy and she makes her character likable, playing the friendly and charming actress.

She is radiant and graceful on stage and her performance is believable.

Audiences will not get enough of her.

Cynthia Magdalena Perez, who plays Judith Canfield, also stands out.

She gives a comical performance as the quick-witted actress who is not afraid of speaking her mind.

Her hilarious facial expressions, sarcastic attitude and wise cracks directed toward Randall’s love interest will have audiences laughing hysterically.

Gracie A. Gilb also gives comical performance as the ex-actress who provides shelter for actresses filled with hope.

Her high pitched voice and crazy wardrobe choices makes the play even more enjoyable.

Although there is a lot of humor in the play, there are also some serious scenes and characters.

Kayla Hamilton, played by Livie Saucedo, gives an outstanding performance as a timid, but hopeful actress with a troubling past trying to make ends meet.

Even though Saucedo’s character is not in a lot of scenes, viewers will not be able to forget her.

She gave a strong, heartbreaking performance.

In one scene, Saucedo’s character breaks the audiences’ heart as she shares her tragic past with Randall and Canfield.

The pain and frustration that Saucedo shows, makes her performance believable.

The costumes, make-up and realistic sets make “Stage Door” a must see.

Audiences will feel like they stepped into a time warp.

Even though Saucedo’s character is not in a lot of scenes, viewers will not be able to forget her.

She gave a strong, heartbreaking performance.

In one scene, Saucedo’s character breaks the audiences’ heart as she shares her tragic past with Randall and Canfield.

The pain and frustration that Saucedo shows, makes her performance believable.

The costumes, make-up and realistic sets make “Stage Door” a must see.

Audiences will feel like they stepped into a time warp.

The women in the play look elegant and stylish in their 1950s costumes.

The costumes are beautiful and colorful.

It will make audiences feel like they are at a fashion show because of all the costume changes.

The women all wear beautiful evening gowns, dresses and retro rompers.

To complete their 1950s look, the women look stunning in their dramatic make-up.

Their make-up goes perfectly with their costumes.

The set also gives a retro vibe.

It looks like an actual house; it will make audiences feel like they live at the Footlights Club House.

The stupendous acting, dramatic make-up, gorgeous costumes and realistic looking sets make “Stage Door” a play worth watching.

It is written by Edna Ferber and George S. Kaufman and directed by ELAC’s W. Colin McKay and David Laird Scott.

The play is about two hours long.

“Stage Door” will play on Friday and Saturday at 8 p.m. and Sunday at 3 p.m. at the Performing and Fine Arts Complex.

Tickets are $12 for general admission, $7 for Elans with ID and $5 for high school students and a parent can get in free of charge.

For more information and reservations, call (323) 415-5333

 

Facebook comments:

 

No comments

Be the first one to leave a comment.

Post a Comment